Paxil Birth Defects

Choose an Experienced Boston Birth Injury Lawyer

Paxil is a drug used to treat depression and anxiety disorders. Studies have shown the antidepressant increases the risk for birth defects when taken by women during the first three months of pregnancy. Thousands of newborns in Massachusetts and across the country have been affected since the drug was introduced in 1992.

In 2010, the manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline paid 800 victims more than $1 billion to settle birth defect cases and allocated additional funds for future claims. Breakstone, White & Gluck, P.C., of Boston is handling Paxil birth defect cases on behalf of Massachusetts and New England families.

Attorney Ronald E. Gluck was counsel to the family of a baby boy who was born with birth defects related to his mother’s use of Paxil throughout her pregnancy.  The mother was not informed of the risks associated with the use of Paxil during pregnancy.  The case against GlaxoSmithKline was resolved in the amount of $1.5 million dollars.    

No warning was given about the drug's risks until 2005, when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the results of a study linking Paxil to the birth defects. At that time, the FDA advised that women not be prescribed the drug in the first three months of pregnancy and that doctors discuss the risks with other pregnant women. GlaxoSmithKline updated its label noting the study's results. But the medicine has not been recalled.

What Kind of Birth Defects Does Paxil Cause?

Heart Defects. The most common birth defects caused by Paxil are heart defects, characterized by holes in the atrial or ventral septum.

Craniosynostosis. This is a congenital birth defect that causes one or more sutures on a baby's head to close early and causes a head to form an abnormal shape. One symptom is the baby's head will not have a soft spot.

Hydrocephalus. This is a build up of fluid inside the skull which leads to brain swelling.

Omphalocele. This is a birth defect in which one of the infant's abdominal organs sticks out of the belly button.

Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn (PPHN). This is an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance that restricts and diverts blood flow and causes other irregularities.

What Compensation is Available for Families?

If your child has a birth defect caused by Paxil, your family may be able to obtain compensation for medical care, lost earnings and pain and suffering. In 2010, GlaxoSmithKline paid over $1 billion to settle birth defect cases. With hundreds of other unresolved cases, the company has set aside $2.4 billion to resolve litigation over two drugs, including Paxil birth defect claims. 

What Should You Do If Paxil Caused a Birth Defect in Your Child?
Free Legal Consultation 800-379-1244

It is important to speak to a qualified Massachusetts product liability lawyer to determine your rights and options. With over 100 years combined experience handling complex medical claims and product liability cases, the attorneys at Breakstone, White & Gluck are here to assist you.

Please call us today, toll free at 1-800-379-1244, and speak with an experienced birth injury lawyer who can assist with your case.

Client Reviews
David really cared about me as an individual…and he really cared about seeking the justice that needed to be sought in the case.
★★★★★
Ron got the insurance company to settle for the maximum on the policy. And so as a result of that, my son went back to school. Jeff
★★★★★
Marc just guided us through the whole process. He told us exactly what would happen and how we needed to go about doing everything. Jesenia
★★★★★
I would recommend David…The outcome of my case, I was very pleased with it. I hope I don't have another accident, but if I do we'll be back to see David. Paul
★★★★★
Ron was excellent. He was on top of everything. He answered every question. John
★★★★★
Marc was extremely professional. I felt very confident that he knew exactly what he was doing. This is his area of practice and I had total confidence in him and I actually have recommended him to other people who have been in accidents. Josh
★★★★★